Author: Sun Connor (Sun Connor)

Home / Sun Connor
Post

Volunteer Spotlight: Rhoda Silverberg

Rhoda first began working in prisons when she lived on the East Coast. After moving back to Austin, Rhoda felt compelled to continue this line of volunteer work, that’s when she learned about the Women’s Storybook Project. “On my very first trip to one of the units in Gatesville, I was hooked. I knew I...

Volunteer Spotlight: Laura Edge
Post

Volunteer Spotlight: Laura Edge

Volunteer Spotlight:  Meet, Laura Edge!   How and when did you first get involved with WSP?   I was at a writer’s conference in Houston doing publicity for my young adult book, Locked Up: A History of the U.S. Prison System, and JoAn Martin, a long-time Storybook volunteer, asked me if I would like to...

Post

The start of BookNotes #WSPturns20

Ron Stimson, an avid WSP supporter, passed away last month after struggling with cancer for two years. He loved the idea of connecting children with their incarcerated mothers and helped with many book drives from Grace Episcopal Church in Georgetown. He was so pleased to watch WSP grow and spread into many units. Most of...

Post

Thoughts from a volunteer: Dr. Breanna (Bree) Boppre shares the importance of empathy and in-prison volunteering

The U.S. is the world leader in incarceration and the social consequences of that status extend beyond prison walls and into the community. Each of the 1.4 million people incarcerated in the U.S. leaves behind a family system. Black, Indigenous, and Hispanic/Latiné families face increased risks due to racial disparities and overrepresentation in the U.S....

20 Statistics between literacy and children #WSPturns20
Post

20 Statistics between literacy and children #WSPturns20

Incarcerated mothers represent a growing population within the prison system. Their children face difficulties in social-emotional well-being, cognitive, and psychological risk due to change of guardian, home, and separation. It is important to note that, “there are no federal, state or local agencies responsible for obtaining information about children separated from their mothers due to...

Volunteer Spotlight: Nicole Oglesby
Post

Volunteer Spotlight: Nicole Oglesby

“I first got involved in WSP in September. I found it by chance after searching for opportunities to serve incarcerated women.” What was your first impression of WSP? The whole experience is very moving. I love seeing the mothers transform emotionally after reading to their children. It’s also a great way to connect with other volunteers through...

Volunteer Spotlight: Breanna Boppre, PhD
Post

Volunteer Spotlight: Breanna Boppre, PhD

“This fall. I saw WSP on Twitter. I looked up more about the organization and thought it would be an excellent service-learning partner for my students in Violence Against Women. We have a whole section on women’s incarceration in the class.” – Dr. Breanna Boppre, Assistant Professor in the Department of Victim Studies at Sam...

  • 1
  • 2
  • 4